Family #LifeIsShort

file000388465185Things can change in the blink of an eye. My sister-in-law and I aren’t close. We don’t call each other often, nor do we know each other’s deepest, darkest secrets. But when my step-daughter called Friday morning to tell me her Aunt Teresa was in the hospital, I couldn’t get there fast enough.

As I waited for Teresa to get out of surgery, wondering if I’d ever get to talk to her again, I reflected on the 20+ years I’ve known her. My favorite memories: dancing & singing along with the band at Little Bit of Texas, eating at Alexander’s Steakhouse (cook your own!), the time we tried to cut up a chicken (what is that? I don’t recognize that at all!), and comparing notes on crafty things we wanted to try (she was one of the few people I trusted with my Cricut cartridges). She was the first person I showed my engagement ring/wedding ring to when her husband proposed.

When they moved her to ICU, I was glad I could sit by her side and offer a tiny bit of comfort at that moment. I was glad I could help her by pushing that call button when she was unable to.

We may have grown apart over the years . . . but don’t we all? I’m sad to say that I talk to very few friends on a regular basis.

But I’m happy to report that I got to hear Teresa’s voice again last night. She’s making progress and doing better than expected. (yea!!!)

Sadly, hers is not the only crisis going on right now. A very good friend of mine is fighting cancer, also at a young age. I hope I am there for her when she needs me. And I hope I am able to make many more memories with both of them.

And that leads me to this post.

Life is precious.

Life is short.

Do not take it for granted.

Take time to call those people who are important to you.

Most of all . . . put that phone down and pay attention to the world around you.

The Cure for Cancer

Link

The Cure for Cancer

The novel I am currently working on involves a researcher who believes he has found the cure for cancer. It is always interesting to see how things make the news once a story idea is swirling around in my brain. Perhaps I just notice them now. My brain is receptive to those ideas. In my novel, the researcher works for a private foundation where testing isn’t quite as controlled and careful as one would hope. Although this speeds up his research, the results can be disastrous . . . for him as well as his wife, it turns out. Professor Hawthorne (click the link above) is much more respectable than my character, and I wish him all the best in his continued research at the University of Missouri.